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Meet the 24-year-old founder behind the career site for cannabis jobs

By 2026, the marijuana industry could be worth $50 billion annually, and 24-year-old Karson Humiston wants to bridge the gap between workers interested in cannabis careers and companies looking to grow their business.

Humiston is the founder of online career platform Vangsters, which provides a central location for cannabis employers to find potential employees. The platform is free for job candidates, but companies using the site pay a fee of $69 per month for unlimited job postings.

Humiston had the idea to recruit talent in the cannabis industry in 2015, when she was a soon-to-be graduate from St. Lawrence University.

Everyone's Talking About the 24-Year-Old Woman Bringing Weed Jobs To The Masses

While the cannabis marketplace is fairly new and therefore has an expansive list of possibilities, Humiston has found her calling in helping it move along as smoothly as possible. That's with the creation of her weed staffing agency, Vangst Talent.

For a field already set to grow 27% by 2021, belonging to 28 states of legalized marijuana, it would make sense to have a trusting expert in the field who can put all the right people in the right places.

From the low-end job bud-tenders to the high-end executive role that just dished out its first $175,000 annually. But still, it's a slippery slope with the law.

This 24-Year-Old Built A LinkedIn For Weed Jobs, No Experience Required

Vangst surfaces job openings in cannabis companies–many of which require no prior industry experience–that established job boards won’t post.

Karson Humiston started a student travel company while she was still an undergraduate at St. Lawrence University in upstate New York. But before she graduated, she’d already decided to do something bigger.

Humiston took stock of her growing professional network–mainly comprised of fellow students and recent grads–and tried to reverse-engineer an idea that they’d all find useful. “A hangover pill would be great,” she quips, “but you have to be capable of creating one.” So if not that, then what about jobs? she thought. “Everyone’s parents would say, ‘The clock is ticking, what are you going to do?'” says Humiston. And since she and her friends were applying to jobs they weren’t passionate about, in fields that didn’t excite them, she recalls, “I started looking into industries that I thought would be exciting to millennials.”

5 Red Flags That You Made A Bad Hire

What do you do when your promising new hire lands with a thud?

The interview process went well, and you were excited to bring on the new employee, but the person who showed up the first week doesn’t seem like the person you thought you hired. It’s possible that a candidate passes your screening process with flying colors and then lands with a thud when they take their desk, but how do you tell the difference between new-job jitters and red flags that you’ve made a mistake?

Start by discerning red flags from overt problems like dishonesty or illegal or immoral actions, says Shani Magosky, author of The Better Boss Blueprint. “Those aren’t red flags; they are more like baseball bats hitting you over the head, and thus require swift action or termination,” she says.

Meet the 24-Year-Old Entrepreneur Who Just Launched a Careers Site for Pot Jobs

Legal weed now employs an estimated 120,000 people; a figure that’s expected to triple in the next few years, according to the research firm New Frontier Data.

For the weed dispensaries, farms, and software companies that will create the bulk of those jobs — and the job seekers who take them — there’s a new interweediery (you’re welcome).

Vangsters, a digital job platform à la Monster.com or Indeed, rolled out this Wednesday with more than open 100 pot-specific positions. There are some salaried gigs, mostly in management roles at distribution and manufacturing facilities, but the bulk of the open spots are compensated hourly. Plant harvesters, trimmers, and salespeople (budtenders, if you will) make up the lion's share.

Vangsters is the Monster.com of weed

The cannabis industry is expected to add more than 250,000 jobs over the next five years according to Vangst, a talent scout agency focused on the marijuana sector. To address this issue the company today unveiled Vangsters — an Indeed for weed.

Vangsters is a confidential place for candidates seeking positions in the cannabis industry to create a profile, upload a resume, and look for positions posted by reputable companies. Employers can view candidates who are interested in the industry and hire straight from the platform.

Vangst Talent Network Launches Vangsters, the Largest Premiere Job Network for the Cannabis Industry

DENVER, Aug. 30, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Vangst Talent Network, the leading staffing agency for the cannabis industry, today launched Vangsters, the largest digital platform created to centralize the job search by effectively connecting talent with cannabis employers. Vangst created the Vangsters platform to connect the cannabis industry in one place. In just thirty days since its 'soft launch' at Vangst's Colorado Career Fair, Vangsters has seen 5,000 job seekers complete profiles on their platform in anticipation of its formal launch. Vangsters currently has 40 cannabis companies signed up, and once live, job seekers will have immediate access to over 100 jobs posted on the platform's job board.

How to get a job in the marijuana industry

For anyone curious about working in the world of weed, a new resource makes job-hunting easier. A recruiting agency for legal cannabis firms has launched a website that aims to serve as a one-stop shop for employers and job seekers. The site, Vangsters, allows hopefuls to apply to jobs and create employee profiles, with a focus on marijuana-specific skills and software.

Vangst Talent Network Launches Vangsters, the Largest Premiere Job Network for the Cannabis Industry

Vangst created the Vangsters platform to connect the cannabis industry in one place. In just thirty days since its 'soft launch' at Vangst's Colorado Career Fair, Vangsters has seen 5,000 job seekers complete profiles on their platform in anticipation of its formal launch. Vangsters currently has 40 cannabis companies signed up, and once live, job seekers will have immediate access to over 100 jobs posted on the platform's job board

How to get a job in the marijuana industry

The legal marijuana business is set to add some 80,000 jobs in the U.S. over the next few years. By 2021, the direct and indirect effect of recreational and medical cannabis, including jobs at businesses that service the pot industry, will create an estimated 400,000 jobs, according to industry analysts Arcview Market Research.

Finding Work in the Cannabis Industry Just Got Easier

Are you tired of working at a dead-end job? Do you feel compelled to help those in need? Can you spot the difference between marijuana cultivated inside, versus outside? If you answered yes to those three questions, you may discover this new website makes finding a job in the marijuana industry considerably easier. “The site, Vangsters.com, allows hopefuls to apply to jobs and create employee profiles, with a focus on marijuana-specific skills and software,” according to CBS News.

24-year-old cannabis recruiter adds jobs board to staffing business

A cannabis industry recruiting firm founded by 24-year-old Karson Humiston has launched an online jobs board for entry-level positions. Vangst Talent, which was called Gradujuana until 2016, rolled out Vangsters in July. The site lists 106 job openings for positions like “budtender.” Humiston said some cannabis companies have difficulty filling jobs but don’t want to pay a recruiting fee. “Not every job needs to have an executive recruiter filling it,” sh said. Humiston said firms in the emerging industry also struggle posting jobs alongside large companies that dominate job listings. Sites like Facebook and Indeed often reject or remove marijuana jobs, she said.

Marijuana jobs: How to get a job in the cannabis industry

The legal marijuana industry breaks down into a few major areas: growing, retailing, infused products and ancillary services (think software development, business-to-business sales and so forth). If you're unsure where to look, thinking about these sectors and their mainstream analogs can help you figure out where to focus your efforts.

Thought Leader: Quick Queries with Vangst Talent Network's Karson Humiston

Karson Humiston's business evolved serendipitously when she realized she could connect people she knew from the student-focused travel agency Karson Humiston is the founder and CEO of Vangst Talent. Karson Humiston is the founder and CEO of Vangst Talent.

Why more and more experienced workers want a new career in cannabis

Job seekers looking for a way into the cannabis industry share details about their backgrounds, aspirations and how they’re working to stand out from the crowd

World's largest cannabis career fair draws thousands.

What industry recruiters call “the world’s largest cannabis career fair” hit Denver this past weekend, with “thousands” in attendance looking for jobs, according to the event organizers.

Get a job in the marijuana industry at this cannabis job fair in Denver

DENVER -- Looking for a job? A career fair in Denver this weekend promises jobs in a major 'growth' industry.

Job Growth In The Age Of Legalization.

With the marijuana industry booming in Colorado and elsewhere, the sector is squarely in its, uh, growth phase. The question for employers now becomes how best to, well, weed out the best applicants.

That’s where Karson Humiston comes in. The 24-year-old recently landed in Denver from upstate New York, where she started Vangst Talent Network, a staffing company that pairs employers with qualified employees throughout all segments of the marijuana business.

Find Your Next Job At The Cannabis Industry's Largest Career Fair Ever.

As the legal cannabis sector continues to grow in Colorado, Vangst formerly Gradujuana, has announced its second Career Fair. Vangst expects to double the size of their first fair, which brought in 2,000 job seekers, 30 recruiting companies and filled over three hundred jobs. The second career fair is scheduled for July 28th 2016 from 2:00 – 8:00 PM at Mile High Station; 2027 Old West Colfax Ave, Denver, CO 80204.

Platinum sponsor LivWell released this statement: “LivWell Enlightened Health is excited to once again sponsor one of the largest career fairs in the cannabis industry. We’re glad to partner with Vangst Talent Network in search of some of Colorado’s top industry talent! We look forward to seeing everyone there!”

Karson Humiston - Founder, Vangst.

Karson Humiston is the Founder and President of Vangst Talent Network (formerly Gradujuana), the cannabis industry’s premier staffing agency. Vangst connects great cannabis companies with the skilled talent they need. Vangst offers direct hire, contract to hire, and temporary staffing solutions to dispensaries, grow facilities, infused product and ancillary cannabis companies. Vangst presents candidates with their perfect employments opportunities. Based on candidates area of specialty.

Marijuana Podcast Discusses Talent Acquisition - How To Get And Keep Employees.

'Worlds Larget' Cannabis Career Fair Coming To Denver.

It’s being called the “world’s largest cannabis career fair” and it’s coming to Denver this week.

More than 50 companies will be looking to fill about 1,000 positions at the job fair on Thursday, according to Vangst Talent Network (formerly Gradujuana.)

The Cannabist Show: She's A Head Hunter For Pot.

• The do’s and don’ts of attending cannabis career fairs (spoiler alert: Don’t get stoned before going).

• Dealing with family members who are skeptical and concerned about marijuana jobs.

• What industry leaders are looking for in prospective employees — from budtenders to CEOs.

Worlds Largest Cannabis Career Fair' Coming To Denver.

A large event, touted as the “World’s Largest Cannabis Career Fair and Expo,” is taking place in Denver this week.

On Thursday, more than 50 cannabis companies will be looking to fill over 1,000 jobs, including bud tenders, dispensary managers to social media associates, according to Vangst Talent Network, the event organizer.

The event isn’t just a place for people to find jobs in the marijuana industry.

Cannabis Job Fair In Denver: Eight Companies That Are Hiring.

It's a great time to be an unemployed weed lover in Colorado: One of the nation's largest cannabis career fairs is coming to Denver on Thursday, July 28.

Over fifty companies ranging from dispensaries to labs are hiring for more than 1,000 positions, from entry level to executive. From 2 to 8 p.m. on July 28, representatives from these companies will be recruiting new hires at Mile High Station, 2027 Old West Colfax Avenue. Among those companies...

Couch Potatoes Need Not Apply: Talent Agency Targets Talent Professionals.

Karson Humiston, the founder and president of Vangst Talent Network, has paired roughly 2,000 jobseekers from a wide range of professional backgrounds with high-profile gigs in the cannabis space, but fighting the industry’s persisting stigma can sometimes feel like a full-time job all on its own.

“This notion of a typical stoner sitting on the couch eating potato chips and smoking weed is what a lot of people carry in their minds…when I tell them I run a cannabis talent agency,” Humiston told Civilized.

Cannabis Jobs Count: Part 4, How To Find A Job In The Cannabis Industry.

As Leafly recently reported, America’s legal cannabis economy now supports more than 122,000 full-time jobs in 29 states and Washington, D.C.

If you don’t have one, how do you get one?

I put the question to Karson Humiston, founder of Vangst Talent Network, the world’s largest staffing and recruiting agency focused specifically on the cannabis industry.

Friends In High Places: The Women Helping You Land A Job In the Weed Industry.

Whether people like it or not, legal cannabis—both medical and recreational—is unarguably on the rise. Colorado is teeming with dispensaries, California is slated to vote in recreational marijuana this fall, and Ohio is about to become the 25th state to legalize medicinal weed. As cannabis permeates US culture and formalizes as an industry, sticking points—both commonplace (How do I find reliable, qualified employees?) and unusual (How do I find reliable qualified employees to work in this highly regulated, often stigmatized industry?)—begin to reveal themselves.

According to Karson Humiston, 'The biggest challenge is probably finding reliable people for the lower-end positions: the budtenders and other people who are working in the actual dispensaries.' (A 'budtender' is like a cannabis barista-slash-sommelier. They work in dispensaries, answering marijuana-specific questions and ringing up purchases in accordance with state law.)